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Impacts of Sexual Violence

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Impacts of Sexual Violence

Sexual Violence Affects Individuals and Communities

Sexual violence impacts can be noticed in many different ways both at the individual level and within broader communities. Just a few examples of the impacts of experiences of sexual violence are Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), anxiety disorders, depression, substance use disorders, lack of safety in communities, increased healthcare costs, and increased social services costs. 

This non-exhaustive list shows how important it is to recognize all the different levels of impact sexual violence has. We will only see thriving communities when we see individuals thrive and when we see stronger services for individuals who have experiences of sexual violence. If someone who has experienced any form of sexual violence is believed, is not made to feel shamed for their experiences or how they are coping with them, and receives trauma-informed care and support in a timely manner, we may be able to mitigate the development of these and many other further mental health disorders. 

When individuals are treated promptly and with trauma-informed care, it allows them to feel more stable and secure, which in turn means they will be better able to manage daily living. This will help reduce the strain on other community resources like our healthcare system, other forms of mental healthcare, and addictions support, supply, and treatment services, to name a few. 

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Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

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Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity

Sexual Violence Umbrella

Sexual violence umbrella portraying different forms in which it occurs

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Sexual violence umbrella

Understanding the sexual violence umbrella

The sexual violence umbrella includes: sexual assault, stalking, sexual harassment, cat calling, sex trafficking, trolling, stealthing, voyeurism, domestic and intimate partner violence, and childhood sexual abuse. Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a part of this umbrella too and while practiced in only certain cultures across the world, Canada continues to see more cases of FGM occurring within and around our communities. 

In this image you will find forms of violence such as voyeurism, meaning, watching someone secretly while they engage in an intimate activity such as showering or changing clothes, etc. Stealthing is a form of SV and GBV that involves withholding or removing contraception without informing one’s partner. 

Another form of gender-based violence to consider is femicide. Femicide is defined as an intentional harm directed towards a woman with the intention of murdering her based on the fact that she is a woman. Incidences of femicide have been more pervasive when we look at the statistics about Indigenous women and girls. 4/10 Indigenous women and girls will experience one or more forms of sexual violence in their lives before the age of 15 years. They also have higher rates of being trafficked in Canada. 

It is important to note that this is not an exhaustive list of forms of sexual violence that can occur in someone’s life. Folks belonging to the 2SLGBTQIA+ community have different experiences of sexual and gender-based violence and usually their experiences are not well recorded or talked about openly because of stigma and fear in the community. More commonly, SV can take place in more than one more forms simultaneously. For example, an individual who has been cat-called before may also experience stalking or harassment by same or different individual.  

For more educational content from KSAC, visit our Learn Hub or the KSAC Youtube Channel.

Sexual violence umbrella portraying different forms in which it occurs
The sexual violence umbrella includes: sexual assault, stalking, sexual harassment, cat calling, sex trafficking, trolling, stealthing, voyeurism, domestic and intimate partner violence, and childhood sexual abuse
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Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Contact Us

Get Involved

Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity

5 Common Types of Traffickers in Canada

Below the title "5 Common Types of Traffickers in Canada) is an image of a female-presenting teenager with shoulder length light brown hair looking at their cell phone in their hand. Their face shows concern and they are sitting with a pillow behind them and a blanket over their body.

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5 Common Types of Traffickers in Canada

5 common types of traffickers in Canada from recent statistics:

5 common types of traffickers in Canada include the boyfriend/Romeo trafficker, family members, peers/friends, drug dealers, and organized crime/gangs. Knowing the common types of traffickers helps us to better understand the ways in which relationships are used as a method of control and manipulation by traffickers. These statistics are from the 2021 report put out by the Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking entitled “Human Trafficking Corridors in Canada”.

Statistics over the years have continued to show that the boyfriend, often known as the “Romeo” trafficker or pimp is typically the highest reported type of trafficker. These individuals have lured and groomed their victims, who typically tend to be young girls and women, with love-bombing, showers of gifts and compliments, attention, and fake promises of a happy future together. By creating this “too good to be true” honeymoon phase with the victim, when the trafficker begins to manipulate them and take away the things they once provided for them, it creates a cycle of abuse where the victim is walking on eggshells and doing anything the trafficker asks of them to keep themselves as safe and stable as possible. 

Of particular note is the statistics for traffickers who are family members of the victim- these cases are particularly difficult as often the trafficked person is very young and may not understand until later in life that the abuse they suffered from family members could be classified as trafficking.

It is also important to note that these different percentages do not add up to 100 since these categories are not mutually exclusive. For example, a trafficker may be a boyfriend to the survivor, but they may also be acting as their drug dealer or be a part of a larger organized crime ring. Always keep in mind that these are reported statistics, meaning there are many other instances that we do not have data for.

 

5 Common Types of Traffickers in Canada: Boyfriend ("Romeo") Trafficker (55%), Organized Crime/Gang Member (49%), Family Member (24%), Peer/Friend (6%), and Drug Dealer (14%). Note: These are stats from Human Trafficking Corridors in Canada report (2021) from the Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking. Stats reported by service providers. Responses do not add to 100% because categories are not mutually exclusive.
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Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Contact Us

Get Involved

Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity

Healthy Relationships

Healthy Relationships Two people holding hands, friends hugging and looking at the sky with love, a couple dancing in the distance happily and few hands holding onto each other with support

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Healthy Relationships

Understanding what the red flags are in a relationship can help you stay safe. Unhealthy relationships can look more than just blaming or guilt-tripping someone. Manipulation in relationships can also stem from using the word ‘love’. On the other hand, you will notice in this audio that qualities of a healthy relationship includes being your true self, having open communication, and respecting each other’s boundaries.  

For more educational videos from KSAC, visit our Learn Hub or the KSAC Youtube Channel.

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Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Contact Us

Get Involved

Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity

Elements of Human Trafficking

Below the title Elements of Human Trafficking is an image of a gas station at night. The air is misty and there is one person standing and wearing a black hat, black jacket and black pants facing the gas station.

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Elements of Human Trafficking

Learn about the Elements of Human Trafficking

Elements of Human Trafficking are important to understand so we are better able to define trafficking and understand what it looks like in Canada.  Based on the UN’s definition, we have provided the three key elements of human trafficking below, along with different examples of what these three elements might involve.

For more educational videos from KSAC, visit our Learn Hub or the KSAC Youtube Channel.

The left side of the page reads: Elements of Human Trafficking Act of control: Recruiting, transporting, concealing, harbouring, transferring, receiving By means of: threat/use of force, coercion, fraud, deceit, abuse of power and vulnerability For the purpose of exploitation: sexual exploitation, forced labour/services, servitude, slavery or similar practices. On the upper right quadrant of the content is an image of a gas station at night. It is misty and there is one person standing wearing a black hat, black jacket, and black pants facing the gas station. In the bottom right quadrant of the content is an image of the back of a person's head and shoulders in the driver's seat of a car. The rearview mirror can be seen at the top middle of the image, and ahead of the man and the mirror is a blurred view of the city street ahead with blurry car and city lights.
Elements of Human Trafficking. Act of control: Recruiting, transporting, concealing, harbouring, transferring, receiving. By means of: threat/use of force, coercion, fraud, deceit, abuse of power and vulnerability. For the purpose of exploitation: sexual exploitation, forced labour/services, servitude, slavery or similar practices.
Alt=””

Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Contact Us

Get Involved

Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity

Updates: Potential Privacy Breach

On December 20, 2023 a laptop computer was stolen from the Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre’s office. This computer had two Microsoft Word documents, each with a list of participants for a psycho-educational group we were running. The list included names and either a phone number or email address. It did not contain any additional information. There was no other client information saved on this computer.

The laptop is encrypted and password protected. Our IT staff immediately updated the password and they have determined that the computer was not accessed, nor were the Microsoft Word documents.

We are confident that no client information was accessed. As per the Personal Health Information Protections Act, we reported the stolen laptop to the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario. We also reported the theft to the Peterborough Police Service.
The Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario recommended that, out of an abundance of caution, we post a notice to our website notifying the public that the computer was stolen.

Any clients who are worried that their information may have been impacted have the right to make a complaint to the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario. Any clients who wish do to so can click on this link to get more information about how to do so. https://www.ipc.on.ca/en.

If you have any questions or concerns about this, please email the Clinical Supervisor, Heather Howe, at hhowe@kawarthasexualassaultcentre.ca or call us at 705-748-5901 and ask to speak with Heather Howe, Clinical Supervisor.

Age of Consent Chart

A child and youth stand together, facing in different directions. The child is playing with a skooter while the youth looks to the distance in thought. The words Age of Consent Chart are shown above.

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Age of Consent Chart

The following is a chart outlining the Age of Consent laws in Canada.

The basic age of consent is 16, however there are some additional exemptions and protections to be aware of. Close in age exemptions have been defined for youth ages 12 to 15 to reflect the realities of peer experimentation in adolescent development. The Age of Consent chart details the peer age ranges that youth can legally consent to engaging in sexual activity with.

Note that while youth CAN legally consent to sexual activity at these ages, they may not choose to; consent must still be freely given, engaged, informed, and specific each time. There are also protections in place where there is a relationship of power or authority over a youth under 18.

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A simple chart outlines the details of Age of Consent law for each age group: - No person under the age of 12 years can give consent to any sexual activity. - A 12 or 13 year old can consent to sexual activity as long as the partner is less than two years older. - A 14 or 15 year old can consent to sexual activity as long as the partner is less than five years older. - Youth 16 years of age and older can consent without age exceptions, however there are exceptions to protect vulnerable youth against power dynamics and sexual exploitation. - Youth ages 18+ are considered adults and subject to the same laws and protections as any other adults.
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Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Contact Us

Get Involved

Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity

5 Phrases for Supporting a Disclosure​

5 Phrases for Supporting a Disclosure

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5 Phrases for Supporting a Disclosure​

Supporting someone who is disclosing sexual assault or abuse can feel overwhelming, and it’s common for people to worry that they won’t know what to say, or that they’ll say the wrong thing. Know that the most important thing is to just listen, and have empathy for what the person is saying. That said, in this audio we explore five key phrases you can use for supporting a disclosure, so that you can feel more confident in your support skills.
 

For more educational videos from KSAC, visit our Learn Hub or the KSAC Youtube Channel.

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Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Contact Us

Get Involved

Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity

Understanding and Setting Boundaries

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Understanding and Setting Boundaries

Understanding and setting boundaries is an important part of healthy relationships. Boundaries are created to protect oneself from harm. Boundaries can be physical or emotional. They can be visible or invisible. It is important to know how to express a boundary in every relationship.

Learn more about boundaries and how to communicate them as well as the importance of boundaries in our lives with this short video presentation.

For more educational videos from KSAC, visit our Learn Hub or the KSAC Youtube Channel.

Alt=””

Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Contact Us

Get Involved

Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity

You Are More Than What Has Happened to You

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You Are More Than What Has Happened to You

Let us help put words to your experience.

The Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre helps hundreds of people tell their stories of sexual violence each year in Peterborough, Northumberland, Haliburton, and Kawartha Lakes.

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Consultation: The Centre offers consultation services to both community agencies and to individuals who have questions about sexual violence and how they might access the services and support they need in their community.

Counselling & Group: The Centre offers individual counselling and various psychoeducational and supportive groups. We also offer workshops on-site and in community.

Accompaniment & Advocacy: Our Centre offers accompaniment to the hospital, connecting with the police,and emotional support at court hearings.

Professional Training and Educational Presentations: Contact the Centre for customized learning and awareness.

Check out the footer below or our Contact page for more information to connect with us.

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Did you know that it costs $50 a month to support one survivor?

KSAC provides healing, safety, and support to those affected by sexual violence and harm, and aims to end sexual violence through prevention education within our communities.

Contact Us

Get Involved

Charitable Business Number: 107837528RR0001

People of All

Backgrounds, genders, sexualities, ages and abilities are treated with respect and dignity in a nonjudgmental and supportive environment at Kawartha Sexual Assault Centre.

A KSAC logo displaying on a progressive pride flag button alongside an accessibility symbol of a person in a wheelchair signal KSAC's commitment to accessibility and inclusivity